Formative literature 1

The Facebook thread: books that changed our lives (or some such). Mine tilt heavily toward the modern and contemporary, but God, in the form of truth, meets us through our loves and fears. He finds us where we are, having arrived himself in advance.
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Reading Radner (part 1)

Of all the delights in the day-to-day work of the Living Church Foundation, the greatest may be the opportunity we have to encourage and give voice to young leaders in the Church, and to be challenged and refreshed by them in turn.
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Dear Church

Katelyn Beaty writes: “You might think I’m writing to throw my lot in with your strongest defenders. After all, I’ve faithfully attended one of your high-church Anglican iterations for seven years, watching with disdain as peers hop from building to building, seeking an ‘awesome’ and ‘powerful’ worship experience (and attractive members of the opposite sex). Instead, I’m writing to apologize.”
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IASCUFO writes from Jamaica

In successive meetings, we have returned to the theology of the human person, known as theological anthropology, exploring what it means to be created in the image and likeness of God in the language of Genesis 1:26-27.
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One body

The leaders of the Episcopal Church now face a “Mauricean” moment, in which the nature and extent of our diversity will be decided.
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Newly strained bonds of affection?

“They’re losing 1,000 members a week,” David Hein says. “The Episcopal Church has now positioned itself way out there on the edge with the United Church of Christ, which is extremely liberal and also losing members.”